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Tag: anthropology

Sep 24, 2012

New Research Findings Consistent With Theory of Impact Event 12,900 Years Ago

New research findings published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) are consistent with a controversial theory that an extraterrestrial body – such as a comet – impacted the Earth approximately 12,900 years ago, possibly contributing to the significant climatic and ecological changes that date to that time period. The paper includes… 

Mar 1, 2012

Food History Q&A, with Mark Kurlansky

Editor’s Note: Mark Kurlansky is the best-selling author of “Cod,” “Salt,” “The Big Oyster” and other books focused on the story (and history) of food. He is the winner of the James Beard Award for food writing and the Bon Appetit Food Writer of the Year, among other awards. Kurlansky is the keynote speaker at… 

Jan 24, 2012

A Guided Tour Of The Bone Lab – Or, Forensic Anthro 101

Last week, NC State hosted the ScienceOnline2012 conference, bringing together a wide variety of people with an interest in communicating about science. During the conference, I had the opportunity to lead a small group of attendees on a tour of the forensic anthropology labs at NC State. The folks on the tour really enjoyed it, so I… 

Jan 23, 2012

NC State forensic sciences: skull mapping

NC State anthropology professor has helped develop skull-mapping software that can trace the ancestry of skulls found by police. 

Aug 25, 2011

Advances In Forensic Anthropology: Creating A Face

Note: This is the third of three posts outlining recent technological advances in forensic science, which were the focus of a workshop held earlier this month at NC State. The workshop, Advances In Forensic Anthropology, was funded by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) and organized by the National Forensic Science Technology Center. When trying to… 

Aug 19, 2011

Advances In Forensic Anthropology: 3D-ID

Note: This is the first of three posts outlining recent technological advances in forensic science, which were the focus of a workshop held earlier this month at NC State. The workshop, Advances In Forensic Anthropology, was funded by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) and organized by the National Forensic Science Technology Center. Sometimes law enforcement… 

Jul 20, 2011

Pirates of the Paleolithic

Avast, ye scurvy Homo erectus!  Recent archaeological finds from Crete show that the first seafaring humans set sail for parts unknown – or maybe parts barely visible to the naked eye – more than 10 times earlier than previously thought. So instead of man settling the Greek island around 10,000 years ago, we now have… 

Dec 10, 2010

The Real Law and Order

On Dec. 7, some of the nation’s top forensics experts participated in the 3rd annual NC State Forensic Science Symposium. The symposium, which draws law enforcement professionals from around the state, puts the latest industry research and news into the hands of crime-solvers. Interesting highlights from the event include: A keynote address by internationally renowned forensics… 

Nov 19, 2010

Hey, Dit Dots! A Coastal N.C. Vocabulary Quiz

It has been said that England and the U.S. are two nations divided by a common language. But you don’t have to travel overseas to find English words and phrases that are virtually impossible to decipher to outsiders. The coastal region of North Carolina is home to a host of terms that make little sense… 

May 13, 2010

Skulls: Now More Of Them Can Speak

The skeletal remains of bygone societies have long been able to tell anthropologists a lot about their civilizations and way of life. However, a significant segment of those populations was left largely mute: the children. Now, new research is likely to give those children a voice. Physical anthropologists can tell a lot about a person… 

Apr 20, 2010

Skeleton Crew

The renovated Park Shops building has everything NC State students need to dig into the past: new workspaces, spacious anthropology labs and plenty of skeletons - in the closet and elsewhere. Now, students can bone up on even the most minute details in pursuit of careers ranging from forensics to archaeology, with little concern of classroom overcrowding.