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In the News

NC State news is shared far and wide. Below are just some of our recent appearances in local, regional, national and international media publications.

Nov 25, 2020 WTVD

Astronaut alum Christina Koch to speak at NC State graduation

North Carolina State University announced that graduate and NASA astronaut Christina Koch will speak for its first-ever virtual graduation. The commencement ceremony will take place December 4. Koch is a three-time graduate of NC State. She graduated in 2001 with a Bachelor of Science in electrical engineering and earned a Bachelor of Science in physics and… 

Nov 25, 2020 WRAL Tech Wire

Gene-editing of crops requires greater transparency, NCSU researchers say

Researchers at North Carolina State University call for a coalition of biotech industry, government and non-government organizations, trade organizations, and academic experts to work together to provide basic information about gene-edited crops to lift the veil on how plants or plant products are modified and provide greater transparency on the presence and use of gene… 

Nov 25, 2020 Forbes

Moderna Vs. Pfizer: How The Market Evaluates Covid-19 Vaccines

A key difference, however, is how the vaccines are shipped and stored. Moderna’s vaccine requires shipment at -20 degrees Celsius, which is considered “frozen” and far less of a logistical challenge than for Pfizer’s vaccine, which must be maintained at -70 degrees Celsius, known as “deep freeze.” In an interview with Scientific American, Julie Swann,… 

Nov 25, 2020 American Veterinary Medical Association

FDA urges collaboration as dilated cardiomyopathy afflicts more dogs

Dr. Teresa DeFrancesco, a professor of cardiology and critical care at the North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine, described in September’s meeting a retrospective study that compared disease severity and outcomes for patients with DCM and congestive heart failure at the university hospital, grouped by whether they were on grain-free or conventional diets.… 

Nov 24, 2020 The Associated Press

Coastal Harm From Invading Saltwater ‘Happening Right Now’ Along East Coast

“It’s not something that we need to wait until 2050 or 2100 for. It’s not something happening only to polar bears. It’s happening right now,” said Marcelo Ardon, an associate professor of ecology and biogeochemistry at North Carolina State University who is documenting changes in North Carolina’s coastline. 

Nov 24, 2020 Forbes

New Tool Could Improve Mental Healthcare For Communities Affected By Covid-19

Tanzid Hasnain and a group of fellow doctoral students in industrial and systems engineering at North Carolina State University and North Carolina A&T University, plus one undergraduate researcher, have designed a new tool aimed at identifying and meeting the mental health needs exacerbated by the pandemic. 

Nov 24, 2020 WTOP

Coastal harm from invading saltwater ‘happening right now’

“It’s not something that we need to wait until 2050 or 2100 for. It’s not something happening only to polar bears. It’s happening right now,” said Marcelo Ardon, an associate professor of ecology and biogeochemistry at North Carolina State University who is documenting changes in North Carolina’s coastline. 

Nov 24, 2020 WUNC

A Revamped Strategic National Stockpile Still Can’t Match The Pandemic’s Latest Surge

But there is a difference between turning down a request and meeting it fully. Robert Handfield, a professor at North Carolina State University and a supply chain expert, said that state officials he has interviewed from across the country had received some of what they requested from the stockpile but far less than they were… 

Nov 23, 2020 WAMU

From Testing To Distribution: The Logistics Behind COVID-19 Vaccines

Early data shows that two COVID-19 vaccines are over 90% effective. So what’s next? We follow the vaccine’s journey from testing to public distribution. – Guest: Julie Swann, professor of industrial and systems engineering at North Carolina State University. (@jlswann) 

Nov 23, 2020 NBC News

Practical hurdles, cultural distrust in Native communities could hamper vaccine distribution

Supply chain experts like Julie Swann, a professor at North Carolina State University who previously advised the CDC during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, are greatly worried about the logistics involved in cold-chain management of the vaccine for these communities. “Pfizer kind of acts like that’s going to solve the problem and to some extent, the… 

Nov 23, 2020 The Washington Post

Preserving cultural and historic treasures in a changing climate may mean transforming them

The United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change recently reported that over the next 30 years flooding in Venice will increase. With the Adriatic Sea rising a few millimeters each year, severe flooding that once happened every 100 years is predicted to happen every six years by 2050, and every five months by 2100. Author:… 

Nov 23, 2020 Triangle Business Journal

NC State’s brain implant could be big step in battle against Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s

Researchers at N.C. State University say they’ve developed a chip that can be surgically implanted in the brain to read neural signals and even deliver electric shocks – potentially paving the way for treatments for diseases such as Alzheimer’s. In a research paper published this month in the journal IEEE Transactions, researchers say the new… 

Nov 20, 2020 Coastal Review Online

NC New Home to Dueling Dinosaurs Fossil

“We have not yet studied this specimen; it is a scientific frontier. The preservation is phenomenal, and we plan to use every technological innovation available to reveal new information on the biology of T. rex and Triceratops. This fossil will forever change our view of the world’s two favorite dinosaurs,” said Lindsay Zanno, head of… 

Nov 20, 2020 Science Magazine

New genetic tools will deliver improved farmed fish, oysters, and shrimp. Here’s what to expect

Cooks and diners hate bones. Nearly half of the top species in aquaculture are species of carp or their relatives, which are notorious for the small bones that pack their flesh. These bones can’t be easily removed during processing, so “you can’t just get a nice, clean fillet,” says Benjamin Reading, a reproductive physiologist at… 

Nov 20, 2020 KPAX

‘Dueling dinosaurs’ fossils show Triceratops, T. rex, may have died after a battle

“We have not yet studied this specimen; it is a scientific frontier. The preservation is phenomenal, and we plan to use every technological innovation available to reveal new information on the biology of T. rex and Triceratops. This fossil will forever change our view of the world’s two favorite dinosaurs,” said Lindsay Zanno, head of…