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Tag: nanotechnology

Dec 2, 2014

Nutrition, Safety Key To Consumer Acceptance of Nanotech, Genetic Modification In Foods

New research shows that the majority of consumers will accept the presence of nanotechnology or genetic modification technology in foods – but only if the technology enhances the nutrition or improves the safety of the food. 

Nov 13, 2014

Researchers Find New Way to Move Atomically Thin Semiconductors for Use in Extremely Flexible Devices

Researchers have developed a new way to transfer thin semiconductor films, which are only one atom thick, onto arbitrary substrates, paving the way for flexible computing or photonic devices. 

Oct 13, 2014

Bio-Inspired ‘Nano-Cocoons’ Offer Targeted Drug Delivery Against Cancer Cells

Researchers have developed a drug delivery system consisting of nanoscale “cocoons” made of DNA that target cancer cells and trick the cells into absorbing the cocoon before unleashing anticancer drugs. 

Oct 3, 2014

Coating Nanotubes With Aluminum Oxide Lowers Risk of Lung Injury

A new study finds that coating multiwalled carbon nanotubes with aluminum oxide reduces the risk of lung scarring, or pulmonary fibrosis, in mice. 

May 9, 2014

New Method Sneaks Drugs Into Cancer Cells Before Triggering Release

Biomedical engineering researchers have developed an anti-cancer drug delivery method that essentially smuggles the drug into a cancer cell before triggering its release. The method can be likened to keeping a cancer-killing bomb and its detonator separate until they are inside a cancer cell, where they then combine to destroy the cell. 

Apr 18, 2014

Impurity Size Affects Performance of Emerging Superconductive Material

Research from North Carolina State University finds that impurities can hurt performance – or possibly provide benefits – in a key superconductive material that is expected to find use in a host of applications, including future particle colliders. The size of the impurities determines whether they help or hinder the material’s performance. 

Mar 24, 2014

Researchers Grow Carbon Nanofibers Using Ambient Air, Without Toxic Ammonia

Researchers from North Carolina State University have demonstrated that vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) can be manufactured using ambient air, making the manufacturing process safer and less expensive. VACNFs hold promise for use in gene-delivery tools, sensors, batteries and other technologies. 

Mar 18, 2014

Researchers Devise New, Stretchable Antenna for Wearable Health Monitoring

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a new, stretchable antenna that can be incorporated into wearable technologies, such as health monitoring devices. 

Mar 17, 2014

Researchers Change Coercivity of Material by Patterning Surface

Researchers from North Carolina State University have found a way to reduce the coercivity of nickel ferrite (NFO) thin films by as much as 80 percent by patterning the surface of the material, opening the door to more energy efficient high-frequency electronics, such as sensors, microwave devices and antennas. 

Mar 11, 2014

New Technique Uses ATP as Trigger for Targeted Anti-Cancer Drug Delivery

Biomedical engineering researchers have developed a new technique that uses adenosine-5’-triphosphate (ATP), the so-called “energy molecule,” to trigger the release of anti-cancer drugs directly into cancer cells. Early laboratory tests show it increases the effectiveness of drugs targeting breast cancer. The technique was developed by researchers at North Carolina State University and the University of… 

Jan 22, 2014

Atomic-Scale Catalysts May Produce Cheap Hydrogen

Researchers at North Carolina State University have shown that a one-atom thick film of molybdenum sulfide (MoS2) may work as an effective catalyst for creating hydrogen. The work opens a new door for the production of cheap hydrogen. 

Jan 16, 2014

Silver Nanowire Sensors Hold Promise for Prosthetics, Robotics

North Carolina State University researchers have used silver nanowires to develop wearable, multifunctional sensors that could be used in biomedical, military or athletic applications, including new prosthetics, robotic systems and flexible touch panels. The sensors can measure strain, pressure, human touch and bioelectronic signals such as electrocardiograms. 

Jan 6, 2014

New Technique Targets Specific Areas of Cancer Cells With Different Drugs

Researchers have developed a technique for creating nanoparticles that carry two different cancer-killing drugs into the body and deliver those drugs to separate parts of the cancer cell where they will be most effective. The technique was developed by researchers at North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Nov 27, 2013

Nanoscale Coatings Improve Stability and Efficiency of Devices for Renewable Fuel Generation

Splitting water into its components, two parts hydrogen and one part oxygen, is an important first step in achieving carbon-neutral fuels to power our transportation infrastructure – including automobiles and planes. Now, North Carolina State University researchers and colleagues from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have shown that a specialized coating technique… 

Nov 25, 2013

Researchers Use Nanoscale ‘Patches’ to Sensitize Targeted Cell Receptors

Researchers from North Carolina State University and Duke University have developed nanoscale “patches” that can be used to sensitize targeted cell receptors, making them more responsive to signals that control cell activity. The finding holds promise for promoting healing and facilitating tissue engineering research.