sociology

May 2, 2018  |  Research and Innovation

Study Links Parental Support and Career Success of Children

A recent study finds young people who get financial support from their parents have greater professional success, highlighting one way social inequality is transmitted across generations.

Dec 13, 2017  |  The Abstract

Collaborative Research Project Aims to Improve Child Welfare in NC

An interdisciplinary group of NC State researchers is helping improve the wellbeing of children across North Carolina.

Aug 31, 2017  |  Awards and Honors

Parcel Appointed Program Director at NSF

Toby Parcel, professor of sociology at NC State, will serve as a program director with the National Science Foundation for at least one year beginning Sept. 5, 2017. Her appointment is part of NSF’s rotating program director initiative through which university faculty work at the federal agency for one or two years.

May 4, 2017  |  Research and Innovation

Increasing Monetary Penalties in NC’s Justice System May Cost Taxpayers

Monetary sanctions designed to help fund the justice system may actually cost state and local governments more than they bring in.

Apr 24, 2017  |  The Abstract

The Brave New World of Social Media Screening for New Hires

How social media tracking is tripping up job applicants, employers, and the Trump administration.

Mar 14, 2017  |  Research and Innovation

Money, Not Access, Key to Resident Food Choices in ‘Food Deserts’

A new study finds that, while access to healthy foods is a significant challenge, the biggest variable limiting diet choices in so-called “food deserts” is limited financial resources.

Oct 12, 2016  |  Research and Innovation

Moms More Likely Than Dads to Favor Both School Diversity And Neighborhood Schools

In the first empirical study on gender and school assignment, researchers find that mothers are more likely than fathers to favor both school diversity and so-called neighborhood schools.

Jul 12, 2016  |  Research and Innovation

Study Finds Broad Range of ‘Independence’ for U.S. Young Adults

The idea of what it means to become “independent” has evolved significantly in recent generations, and new research from NC State finds that the concept of being either dependent or independent doesn’t apply to almost half of young adults in the United States.

Jan 13, 2016  |  The Abstract

Racial Makeup of Labor Markets Affects Who Gets Job Leads

Research from North Carolina State University and Rice University finds that the racial composition of a labor market plays a significant role in whether workers find out about job leads – regardless of the race of the worker.

Dec 3, 2015  |  The Abstract

Research Seeks Answers to Black Lung Resurgence in Central Appalachia

Black lung is making a resurgence among miners in central Appalachia. And one NC State researcher wants to know why.

Nov 30, 2015  |  Research and Innovation

Study: Kids From High Socioeconomic Background More Likely to Rely on Parental Help as Young Adults

A recent study finds that more than 40 percent of young adults no longer live with their parents, but still receive at least some financial support from mom and dad – and this is particularly true for grown children from higher socioeconomic backgrounds.

Sep 15, 2015  |  The Abstract

Tequila, Mezcal and Social Science: Q&A With Sarah Bowen

Sarah Bowen knows a lot about tequila and mezcal. Her new book, Divided Spirits: Tequila, Mezcal, and the Politics of Production, explores the complex web of relationships – from farmers to bartenders – involved in transforming agave grown in Mexico into high-end spirits and cocktails consumed around the world.

Sep 14, 2015  |  The Abstract

Researchers Aim to Understand What Drives School Diversity or Resegregation

Why are some school districts able to maintain economic diversity in their schools, while others have become effectively resegregated in recent decades? That’s a question being explored by a team of researchers led by NC State University under a grant from the National Science Foundation.

May 21, 2015  |  The Abstract

Race, Politics, and Neighborhood Schools: What You Can Learn From a School Board Election

Local school board elections can be sleepy affairs, but the past decade saw heated debate over elections to the Wake County Board of Education in North Carolina – a debate that raised issues of race, social ties, and what K-12 schools should do in order to best serve their students.

May 19, 2015  |  The Abstract

Fisheries, Society and Sustainability: A Q&A With Stefano Longo

What happens when part of the ecosystem becomes a commodity? Stefano Longo explores this and other questions in his new book on fisheries and environmental sociology.