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Tag: physics

Dec 13, 2010

Dispatches From The North Pole: How Santa Gets Around

Editor’s Note: This is the third in a series of occasional dispatches from Dr. Larry Silverberg, a researcher at NC State who is leading a visiting scholars program at Santa’s Workshop-North Pole Labs (NPL). Dr. Silverberg is an expert in unified field theory and is accompanied by four other mechanical and aerospace engineers: Drs. Mohammad Zikry… 

Nov 30, 2010

Dispatches From The North Pole: The Science of Santa’s List

Editor’s Note: This is the first in a series of occasional dispatches from Dr. Larry Silverberg, a researcher at NC State who is leading a visiting scholars program at Santa’s Workshop-North Pole Labs (NPL). Dr. Silverberg is an expert in unified field theory and is accompanied by four other mechanical and aerospace engineers: Drs. Mohammad Zikry… 

Nov 29, 2010

Building a Better Sun-Trap

How does the saying go? Build a better solar cell and the world will beat a path to your efficiently temperature-controlled and environmentally friendly door? Okay, maybe that’s not exactly the saying, but you’ve got to admit that the idea of cheaper, more efficient solar technology is at least as compelling today as the idea… 

Oct 7, 2010

Technique Allows Researchers to Examine How Materials Bond at the Atomic Level

An approach pioneered by researchers at North Carolina State University gives scientists new insight into the way silicon bonds with other materials at the atomic level. This technique could lead to improved understanding of and control over bond formation at the atomic level, and opportunities for the creation of new devices and more efficient microchips.… 

Oct 3, 2010

A Different Take

Since 2002, countless professors and thousands of university students had pored over the leading introductory electrodynamics textbook used today. But something in a recent lesson didn't ring true to physics doctoral student David Babson, who realized - and confirmed - an inconsistency in the text, related to one of the field's most basic principles. 

May 11, 2010

Beichner Wins UNC System Teaching Award

Dr. Robert J. Beichner, a innovator in physics education, received an Award for Excellence in Teaching from the University of North Carolina Board of Governors. 

Apr 20, 2010

Get Smart

Agent 86 would be proud. Dr. Jay Narayan led the way in the development of “smart sensors,” integrating a sensor material called vanadium oxide with silicon chips to create sensors that can manipulate and respond to information (it has to do with something called “domain matching epitaxy”). These sensors are used in a variety of… 

Apr 19, 2010

The Physics of Falling Fruit

Picture this – you’re at the store, in a hurry, and you just need to grab a couple of apples, so you head over to the produce section and pluck a likely looking specimen from the pile…only to watch in horror as the entire pyramid of golden delicious topples at your feet.  If you’ve ever… 

Apr 1, 2010

Beichner Named Fellow

Robert Beichner, Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor of Physics, has been named an American Council on Education fellow for the 2010-11 academic year. 

Jan 21, 2010

Physics Professors Recognized

Three physics professors have been named fellows of the American Physical Society. 

Nov 19, 2009

Beichner Prof of the Year

Physics professor Robert Beichner has been named North Carolina Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Council for Advancement and Support of Education. 

Nov 12, 2009

Physics of Free Throws

Two NC State engineers have figured out the best way to shoot a free throw – a frequently underappreciated skill that gets more important as the game clock winds down. 

Sep 17, 2009

Mitchell Awarded Nuclear Grant

Dr. Gary Mitchell, professor of physics, received an $800,000 grant from the National Nuclear Security Administration. 

Sep 17, 2009

Energizing Physics Classes

The MILLIE project provides smaller seminar-like experiences for students in Professor Bob Beichner's introductory physics courses. 

Jun 25, 2009

A Penny for Your Prions

North Carolina State University researchers have discovered a link between copper and the normal functioning of prion proteins, which are associated with transmissible spongiform encephalopathy diseases such as Cruetzfeldt-Jakob in humans or “mad cow” disease in cattle. Their work could have implications for patients suffering from these diseases, as well as from other prion-related diseases…