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Tag: ecology

Oct 3, 2011

Spanish Colonialism’s Environmental Legacy, Part Three: The Toxic Present

Editor’s Note: This is the last of three guest posts by NC State history lecturer Nicholas Robins, an expert on the environmental history of South America and author of “Mercury, Mining and Empire: The Human and Ecological Cost of Colonial Silver Mining in the Andes.” Robins is also founder and president of the Environmental Health Council,… 

Sep 29, 2011

Spanish Colonialism’s Environmental Legacy, Part Two: ‘A Black Shadow Of Hell’

Editor’s Note: This is the second of three guest posts by NC State history lecturer Nicholas Robins, an expert on the environmental history of South America and author of “Mercury, Mining and Empire: The Human and Ecological Cost of Colonial Silver Mining in the Andes.” Robins is also founder and president of the Environmental Health Council,… 

Sep 27, 2011

Spanish Colonialism’s Environmental Legacy, Part One: Origins

Editor’s Note: This is the first of three guest posts by NC State history lecturer Nicholas Robins, an expert on the environmental history of South America and author of “Mercury, Mining and Empire: The Human and Ecological Cost of Colonial Silver Mining in the Andes.” Robins is also founder and president of the Environmental Health Council,… 

Sep 8, 2011

Monster Fish Q & A, with Zeb Hogan

Editor’s Note: Dr. Zeb Hogan is an assistant research professor at the University of Nevada-Reno, and host of the National Geographic series “Monster Fish.” Hogan is the keynote speaker at NC State’s Frederick and Joan Barkalow Distinguished Conservationist Lecture, which will be held Sept. 14 from 1:30-2:30 p.m. in David Clark Labs, Room 101. The event… 

Aug 26, 2011

Send In The Ants

Editor’s Note: This guest post was written by David Hunt, of NC State’s News Services. I don’t want to alarm you, but you may have Camponotus americanus crawling around in your backyard. Or Tetramorium caespitum creeping between the cracks in your front walkway.  In fact, there are more than 200 species of these critters sharing our… 

May 20, 2011

Bad Bugs of Summer: Carpenter Bees

Our first two posts on the bad bugs of summer were about bloodsuckers: mosquitoes and ticks. We’ll now look at a pest that is a plague on our homes, if not our flesh – carpenter bees. However, in keeping with tradition, this “bad bug of summer” is not a true bug. Why are carpenter bees… 

May 17, 2011

Bad Bugs of Summer: Ticks

In our second post on the bad bugs of summer, we’ll be talking about ticks. Or, as I like to think of them, those bloodsucking disease spreaders. First of all, I really shouldn’t call ticks “bad bugs.” Technically, they’re not bugs at all. Of course, mosquitoes aren’t either. But ticks aren’t even insects. They’re arachnids.… 

Apr 21, 2011

Earth Day: Global Research Challenges

For more than 40 years, Earth Day has been a call to arms to appreciate and protect our natural environment. In order to accomplish that mission, we must first understand the challenges threatening our environmental health and sustainability. 

Apr 18, 2011

Earth Day: Research Challenges

For more than 40 years, Earth Day has been a call to arms to appreciate and protect our natural environment. Improving our understanding of the environment is an essential component of that mission. With that in mind, we have asked researchers in fields ranging from wildlife ecology to meteorology to political science to briefly outline… 

Aug 5, 2010

Cataloging Critters

What is an insect museum and why is it important? Find out by checking out our question-and-answer segment with Dr. Andy Deans, NC State assistant professor of entomology and director of the university’s Insect Museum, which lives and grows in Gardner Hall. Responses have been lightly edited for style or clarity. Q. What purpose does the… 

Aug 3, 2010

Jeremiah Was A Bullfrog…I Think

Can you identify a frog based solely on what it sounds like? I can’t. And apparently, I’m not alone. New research published in this month’s Ecology shows that even trained observers (or whatever you call listeners) can make mistakes when it comes to identifying frog species and estimating their numbers. That could be a big… 

Jun 18, 2010

Welcome to the Deepwater Horizon MC252 Incident

Editor’s Note: This is a guest post by Dr. Greg Massey, DVM, DABVP, a postdoctoral research associate at NC State who is currently using his expertise to help wildlife – particularly birds – who have been affected by the oil spill on the Gulf Coast. He will be writing about his experiences periodically on The Abstract.… 

Jun 9, 2010

Turning Up The Heat to Study Climate Change

It’s getting really hot in forests located in Orange County, N.C., and Petersham, Mass. NC State biologist Rob Dunn and colleagues are turning up the heat in Duke Forest and Harvard Forest – the southern and northern edges of many animal species habitats – to  learn more about the effects of climate change, particularly on ants.… 

May 5, 2010

Buggin’ Out

Tracking invasive pests around the world sounds like it would make for an interesting show on the Discovery Channel. But don’t be fooled – the work that goes into tracking these species is less “Deadliest Catch” and more “Dirty Jobs.” Researchers at NC State partnered with scientists and analysts from around the globe to determine recommendations…