Oct 5, 2016  |  Research and Innovation

Urban Warming Slows Tree Growth, Photosynthesis

New research finds that urban warming reduces growth and photosynthesis in city trees. The researchers found that insect pests are part of the problem, but that heat itself plays a more significant role.

Sep 1, 2016  |  Research and Innovation

It’s a Boy: Modified Male Flies Could More Efficiently Control Screwworm Population

Suppressing populations of devastating pests may be easier with the release of genetically modified males.

Jun 29, 2016  |  The Abstract

Expanding Outreach to Support Bees and Other Pollinators

A lot of people want to know what they can do to help bees – and a new initiative at NC State is aimed at helping to meet that demand.

Jun 21, 2016  |  Research and Innovation

How Native American Agriculture Spread Bees in Pre-Columbian North America

Using genetic markers, researchers have for the first time shown how cultivating a specific crop led to the expansion of a pollinator species. In this case, the researchers found that the spread of a bee species in pre-Columbian Central and North America was tied to the spread of squash agriculture.

May 18, 2016  |  Research and Innovation

No Junk-Food Diet: Even in Cities, Bees Find Flowers and Avoid Processed Sugars

New research from NC State finds that bees in urban areas stick to a flower-nectar diet, steering clear of processed sugars found in soda and other junk food.

May 17, 2016  |  The Abstract

Assessing the Positive and Negative Claims About Genetically Engineered Crops

Genetically engineered crops stir strong feelings from both critics and supporters. We talk to the researcher who chaired the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine committee that just released a report, “Genetically Engineered Crops: Experience and Prospects,” which examines the evidence behind positive and negative claims about GE crops, and the research challenges that lie ahead.

Apr 14, 2016  |  Research and Innovation

Study Argues ‘Winner-Winner’ Behavior May Shape Animal Hierarchies

Researchers have developed a behavioral model that explains the complexity and diversity of social hierarchies in ants, and which scientists believe may help us understand the nature of other animal societies – from primates to dolphins.

Mar 23, 2016  |  Research and Innovation

Modified Maggots Could Help Human Wound Healing

NC State entomologists genetically modify maggots to aid human wound healing.

Mar 9, 2016  |  Research and Innovation

Study Finds More Social Insects Have Weaker Immune Response, Highlights Role of Hygiene

Research finds that among eusocial insects – like ants, bees and termites – the more individuals there are in a typical species colony, the weaker the species’ immune response. The finding strongly suggests that hygiene behaviors, and not just immune systems, play a key role in keeping eusocial insects healthy.

Feb 22, 2016  |  The Abstract

Rediscovering the Forgotten Benefits of Drawing

Over a century ago, the ability to draw was a necessity. No cameras, printers, copiers, or online images - if you wanted to convey information visually, you had to do it yourself. Jennifer Landin explains why those skills are still important.