entomology

Aug 15, 2018  |  Research and Innovation

In the Wild and the Lab, Female Mosquitoes Get Choosy Quickly to Offset Invasions

Female mosquitoes show rapid genetic changes when threatened by invading cousin mosquitoes.

Jul 18, 2018  |  Research and Innovation

Cities as Study Proxies for Climate Change

Cities can be useful surrogates for studying climate change, according to NC State research.

Jun 26, 2018

10 of the Most Diabolical Crop Pests in North Carolina

Ten of the most vexing pests that prey on agriculture in North Carolina.

Jun 21, 2018  |  The Abstract

7 Fascinating NC Arthropods (That You’ve Never Heard Of)

Meet seven little critters that live around North Carolina -- and that you've probably never noticed.

Jun 12, 2018  |  The Abstract

4 of North Carolina’s Oddest Pollinators (They Aren’t Bees)

An NC State entomologist lists four of North Carolina's oddest pollinators.

Jun 7, 2018  |  The Abstract

Researchers Gain Insight Into Chromosome Evolution in Flies

NC State researchers have shed new light on the evolution of fly chromosomes by identifying a gene indispensable for male survival in a devastating livestock pest species. What they found could have important implications for genetic pest control.

Mar 21, 2018  |  The Abstract

Could Insects Help Us Find New Yeasts for Big Business?

Yeasts are tiny fungi – but they play key roles in producing everything from beer and cheese to industrial chemicals and biofuels.

Mar 19, 2018  |  Research and Innovation

Termite Queen, King Recognition Pheromone Identified

Forget the bows and curtsies. Worker termites shake in the presence of their queens and kings. New research explains how these workers smell a royal presence.

Mar 13, 2018  |  Research and Innovation

Lack of Water is Key Stressor for Urban Trees

A recent study finds that urban trees can survive increased heat and insect pests fairly well – unless they are thirsty.

Feb 21, 2018  |  The Abstract

Flowers Aren’t Enough: How Urban Heat Affects Bee Populations

In cities, even gardens rich with flowers do not have the same bee abundance or diversity as natural areas. Why not?