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Tag: genetics

Dec 2, 2014

Nutrition, Safety Key To Consumer Acceptance of Nanotech, Genetic Modification In Foods

New research shows that the majority of consumers will accept the presence of nanotechnology or genetic modification technology in foods – but only if the technology enhances the nutrition or improves the safety of the food. 

Nov 17, 2014

Something Resistant This Way Comes: An Insect Mystery

An NC State entomology researcher has found that a feared crop pest found in North Carolina is becoming resistant to a common method used to protect crops. 

Oct 30, 2014

A Decade of Genes, Chemicals and Human Health: The Comparative Toxicogenomics Database Turns 10

A Decade of Genes, Chemicals, and Human Health: the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database Turns Ten 

Oct 28, 2014

New Technique Uses Bacteria’s Own CRISPR-Cas System to Turn Off Genes

NC State researchers have developed a technique that co-opts an immune system already present in bacteria and archaea to turn off specific genes or sets of genes – creating a powerful tool for future research on genetics and related fields. 

Sep 30, 2014

The Root(worm) of the Problem: Unexpected Obstacles on the Road to Research

Scientists often have to spend an enormous amount of time becoming experts in things outside their field of study in order to do research they think is important. This is where a corn-eating beetle and a guy named Clay Chu come in. 

Aug 27, 2014

Three Things You Didn’t Know About the Arachnids That Live on Your Face

Right now, in the general vicinity of your nose, there are at least two species of microscopic mites living in your pores. Scientists have just published a study about these little-known mites. 

May 15, 2014

Small Number of Genes Have Big Impact on Fish Egg Quality

NC State researchers have taken a big step toward solving a puzzle that has long vexed vertebrates – predicting egg quality, or the viability of embryos in eggs. Using gene expression data and computer modeling, the researchers examined farmed striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and showed that the coordinated interactions of less than 2 percent of the… 

Jul 18, 2013

New Technique for Assessing Calorie Absorption Sheds Light on Genetic Driver of Obesity

Researchers from Harvard, NC State and five other universities have found a specific genetic on-off switch associated with obesity in both mice and humans, raising the long-term possibility of developing new treatments for obesity. As part of the study, NC State researchers had to develop a new technique for assessing calorie absorption in small laboratory animals, which… 

Jan 4, 2013

Huang Scores Travel Award

Postdoc research scholar Wen Huang was honored with a Spring 2013 DeLill Nasser Travel Award from the Genetics Society of America. 

Nov 7, 2012

Navel-Gazing Researchers ID Which Species Live in Our Belly Buttons (But Don’t Know Why)

Researchers have discovered which bacteria species are most commonly found in our bellybuttons, but have still not discovered what governs which species will be found on which people. These are the first published findings of the Belly Button Biodiversity project led by NC State’s Dr. Rob Dunn. The researchers swabbed the belly buttons of 66 study… 

Jul 20, 2012

What’s the Deal With Seedless Watermelons?

Seedless watermelons aren’t seedless. They have those little white seeds that don’t have hard black shells, like the seeds in seeded watermelons. How do they do that?  Glad you asked! In seeded watermelons, the seed develops its hard seed coat (or testa) once it is fertilized. But, because seeds in seedless watermelons cannot be fertilized,… 

May 22, 2012

Sharing Colors to Survive

At first glance, the vibrantly colored and patterned butterflies living in Central and South America wouldn’t seem to have much in common with that notorious beast of burden – the mule. In a paper published last week in Nature, though, researchers found that different species of Heliconius butterflies use interbreeding to acquire colorful wing patterns… 

May 17, 2012

Hemlock History Repeating Itself?

Scientists trying to save eastern hemlock trees from widespread insect attacks may have uncovered a case of déjà vu, dating back millennia. “Our hypothesis is that 7,000 to 8,000 years ago, insects hammered the eastern hemlock in a similar way to how it’s being hammered now,” says Kevin Potter, lead researcher on a paper published… 

May 8, 2012

Why Don’t We Study Bed Bugs?

Bed bugs have garnered a lot of attention over the past few years, including coverage from mainstream media outlets (e.g., a search of the New York Times website for “bed bugs” calls up 4,270 mentions over the past 12 months). But their high profile has not led to a commensurate increase in related research. Bed… 

Feb 27, 2012

Fruit Flies, Mice and How Their Genetic Codes Can Help You

In the past two weeks, NC State geneticists Trudy Mackay and David Threadgill, working with collaborators from across the globe, have published landmark scientific papers and made available new resources that will make it easier for researchers to tease out the links between an organism’s genetic blueprint and its behavior or traits.